There’s no stopping vinyl: Sony is even joining the game – It’s about time…

The Sony Music Entertainment group made an announcement a while back that it would once again they will be manufacturing vinyl records. This comes after almost 30 years of declaring them dead. Go figure.

This move is believed to have been prompted by the increasing demand for vinyl over the past few years. Interestingly enough, some of the people who are now looking into vinyl records are from a younger generation that has never used them before and obviously from older fans as well. While most young people still prefer streaming music over records, it has been discovered that consumers aged 35 years and younger accounted for 70% of the sale of records last year in the US. The decision to start making vinyl records again comes after 28 years when Sony had decided to put an end the production of LPs to focus more on CDs which had begun to corner the market back in 1989.

The decision to start making vinyl records again comes after 28 years when Sony had decided to put an end the production of records to focus more on CDs which had begun to corner the market back in 1989. It was probably a good move then and an even better one now to get back into the LP market.

Over the past few years, record sales have enjoyed a steady growth. Earlier this year, BPI, an organization based in Britain, released research which showed that vinyl sales in 2016 reached the same levels as in pre-1991. In the U.K alone, vinyl sales have increased to 53% thereby bringing the total to 3.2 million units sold. The US has also seen an increasing surge in LP sales. BuzzAngle music released a finding which showed records sales gaining 25.9% thereby moving approximately 7.2 million units in 2016 alone. Various reports also predict that vinyl sales will reach the 800 – 900 million dollar mark and will eventually surpass the 1 billion dollar mark.

BuzzAngle music released a finding which showed records sales gaining 25.9% thereby moving approximately 7.2 million units in 2016 alone. Various reports also predict that vinyl sales will reach the 800 – 900 million dollar mark and will eventually surpass the 1 billion dollar mark. That’s a staggering amount of physical music sales.

Both Sony and Panasonic introduced new record player models in 2016 to cash in on the returning trend. Sony has also stated that the production of vinyl records will start in Tokyo in a production company located just southwest of the country which has already installed record cutting equipment. The company has also hiring experienced vinyl engineers who will ensure that all the vinyl records will be reproduced in high-quality sound. However, LP record sales in Japan have not experienced a huge rise as seen in both the US and UK and consumers in the country have bought only 799,000 vinyl records.

The company has started hiring experienced record engineers who will ensure that all the records will be reproduced in high-quality sound. The growth of vinyl is good for many economies, with old jobs like vinyl engineers even starting to make a comeback.

However, vinyl record sales in Japan have not experienced a huge rise as seen in both the US and UK and consumers in the country have bought only 799,000 vinyl records.

VE explains it in detail here:

Some of the top 10 lists of LPs feature an interesting mix of both classic and contemporary hits. Ed Sheeran’s album “Divide,” currently leads the vinyl charts and the late Amy Winehouse’s album “Back to Black” is second in the lead. Also in the lead include classic albums such as The Beatles’ “Abbey Road” and Pink Floyd’s “The Dark Side of the Moon.” However, don’t expect to purchase vinyl records easily from Sony’s production company in Japan. The company’s Tokyo factory is only taking orders from outside record labels. Since the company currently has only one active record manufacturer, it may have a difficult time keeping up with demands, but more vinyl record branches are expected to be established by Sony in the years to come.

Other includes classic albums such as The Beatles’ “Abbey Road” and Pink Floyd’s “The Dark Side of the Moon.” However, don’t expect to purchase vinyl records easily from Sony’s production company in Japan. The company’s Tokyo factory is only taking orders from outside record labels. Since the company currently has only one active vinyl record manufacturer, it may have a difficult time keeping up with demands, but more LP branches are expected to be established by Sony in the years to come.

Currently, the biggest challenge that Sony faces is the lack of engineers who are experienced in the manufacture of records. Retired engineers are now making a comeback to the music industry to play an advisory role and pass on their knowledge and expertise to younger employees.

While it is indeed true that vinyl records are making a significant comeback in the music industry, its sales will still be hindered by formats which still dominate the industry such as CDs and digital music.

Either way, it’s super cool to see this old format making a comeback and one can only dream all the developments and changes it will bring to the music industry.